How To Think Like an Interior Designer

How To Think Like an Interior Designer

The style of Scandinavian inside plan and hygge stylistic layout has cleared the world over with an unmistakable look hailed in our most loved outline magazines and online journals. With an emphasis on effortlessness, moderation and usefulness, this outline development which rose in the 1950s has included a gratefulness for craftsmanship and downplayed tastefulness in homes.

Here’s a brisk guide with our best tips for making Scandinavian inside outline in your own particular home. Before the finish of this post, you’ll know precisely how to inject a space with the shrewd usefulness and satisfying style of Scandinavian insides!

A current Decorilla Design customer visit to extraordinary compared to other Scandinavian outline capitals, Copenhagen, Denmark, affirms the wild fascination for this present style’s components.

Take accurate measurements

While homeowners are often tempted to rush out to the shops, designers know that it’s vital to start with the practicalities. That means taking accurate measurements of your room or rooms, and even drawing out a bird’s-eye view plan so you can work out how everything is going to fit together. Not only do you need to know how long each wall is, but how high the ceiling is (this will affect your choice of ceiling lights), plus where any obstacles are – this includes windows, doors, fireplaces, nooks and so on. Make a note of which way doors open to, and pinpoint any plug sockets that might influence the positioning of things like the television or lamps. Taking photographs of your room can also be useful. Capture as many different angles as possible to give you a good sense of your space.

Set yourself a brief

The first thing a professional designer will do when sitting down with a client is get a really clear idea of the scope of the project. What is it that you’re actually looking to achieve? Do you want a complete transformation or do you just need to freshen things up a bit? Think about the functionality of the room; how it is used and who by? Is it currently serving your needs? Perhaps you’ve started working from home, or your kids have gone off to university – changes in your lifestyle that should be reflected in your home. It might seem unnecessary, given that you’re both the client and the designer, but writing down your brief will help keep you on track, especially when you start getting waylaid by that really pretty sofa fabric that is actually far too pale to deal with the kids’ sticky fingers.

Create a mood board

This is another vital planning step, and one that many home owners skip. You might feel like it’s too much effort, but this isn’t art – you don’t need to create something neat and tidy that you can show to other people. The idea is to bring together different elements of your room so that you can check it all works, before you start spending – and possibly wasting – money in the shops. Fabric samples, paint charts, inspirational pictures from magazines and actual items you like from catalogues can all form part of your board. Stick them on a piece of cardboard, use masking tape to attach them to a whiteboard or wall, or pin them to a pin board. You can even make a digital version, if you prefer. This can be done in a simple Word document, but there are also useful online tools such as Canva, Moodboard, Oliboard and, of course, Pinterest, that make it super easy.

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Set a budget

Yes, we’re still in the practical zone here. Because as a home lover you’ll know just how easy it is to get carried away and spend all your available cash on wow factor artwork and pretty accessories, before you’ve even worked out how much that new flooring is going to cost. Deciding what you need and how much you can afford right at the ­beginning, means you can decide where you need to be a bit more frugal and where you can allow yourself a little more leeway. Don’t just resort to guessing either. Do a bit of research to see what things really cost. And give yourself a few options – compare hardwood versus laminate flooring, ­granite surfaces versus wood or marble, a leather couch ­versus a fabric one. Think about where you might be able to reuse things you already own that are currently languishing forgotten in a different room. Or can you get things second hand? This sort of planning might not be as fun as shopping, but it will put you firmly in control of your project, just like an ­interior designer would be.

Know where to spend your money

It’s perfectly possible to ­decorate a room without bankrupting yourself, as every good designer knows. The trick is to spend in the areas that count. This usually means the items that are going to need to last longest and see the most wear – flooring, sofas, mattresses and so on. Then there are the statement items, such as lighting or artwork. Once you’ve invested in these, you can grab as many bargains as you like, and your look will never feel cheap. Those more expensive items will provide a lift, giving you an enviable finish you’ll want to show off.

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